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Sophia Keller's avatar

Sophia Keller

Community Team

"To support and participate in the needs of the Pacific Northwest, its peoples, its cultures and its ecosystems. "

Points Total

  • 0 Today
  • 0 This Week
  • 441 Total

Participant Impact

  • up to
    2
    documentaries
    watched
  • up to
    570
    minutes
    spent learning
  • up to
    15
    locally sourced meals
    consumed
  • up to
    5
    public officials or leaders
    contacted

Sophia's Actions

Nature

Pollinator Support

In the spring I will seed the open areas in my neighborhood with native wildflowers that attract pollinators. I chose this because pollinators have dwindling habitat and, without their participation, our plant life is also endangered. I hope my action promotes cooperation between species to create a healthier ecosystem.

Completed
One-Time Action

Community

Learn About Local Environmental Justice Concerns

I will spend 120 minutes researching environmental justice concerns that effect people and the connection to downstream fish and wildlife, their causes, and local initiatives to address these concerns.

Completed
One-Time Action

Community

Support Environmental Initiatives lead by People of Color

Racial inequity is both a sustainability and justice problem. I will support and seek out conservation organizations lead by people of color in my community, as their efforts address environmental justice, Puget Soundand/or Pacific Ocean health.

COMPLETED 4
DAILY ACTIONS

Education

How does my local government support Orcas?

I will spend 60 learning about how my government is supporting watershed and orca health and encourage them to do more.

Completed
One-Time Action

Education

Contact my elected officials

I will contact my local elected officials and explain why I care about Salmon/Orcas and how investment in habitat restoration and acquisition is needed for their survival.

Completed
One-Time Action

Education

Join the Orca Forum to learn from local researchers

Learn about orca research taking place in the Puget Sound in this workshop put on by Whidbey Island CD in partnership with Northwest Straits Foundation and County Marine Resource Committees. Wednesday, Oct. 14 5:30-7pm

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Education

Learn about my watershed

I will spend 120 minutesIdentifying what sub-basin I live in and learning about my watershed's water quality, fish habitat problems, and options for volunteering.

Completed
One-Time Action

Transportation

Learn about boat noise impacts

I will spend 60 minutes learning about how boat noice impacts Orcas and then I will change my boating habits to reduce my impact.

Completed
One-Time Action

Food

Learn More about Food Deserts

I will spend 30 minutes learning about food deserts and find out how I can advocate for healthy and fresh Puget Sound food in my region.

Completed
One-Time Action

Food

Locally-Sourced Meals

I will source 3 meal(s) per day from local Puget Sound producers.

COMPLETED 5
DAILY ACTIONS

Food

Watch a Documentary about Food Sovereignty

I will watch 2 documentary(ies) about food sovereignty: the right of local peoples to control their own food systems including markets, ecological resources, food cultures and production methods.

Completed
One-Time Action

Feed


  • Sophia Keller's avatar
    Sophia Keller 11/03/2020 3:59 AM
    I joined this challenge to check my awareness of environmental issues in our PNW region, and to expand my understanding.  Each of us contributes individual action, but community coordination is important too.  I wanted to learn how to harmonize my personal efforts with those of the community.
  • Reflection Question
    Transportation Learn about boat noise impacts
    Do you know how orcas communicate? If you found your food, communicated with your family, learned of safety all through sound, but that sound was interrupted or muffled on a regular basis, would you imagine that to impact your ability to eat and navigate?

    Sophia Keller's avatar
    Sophia Keller 11/03/2020 3:57 AM
    Orcas communicate through sounds that they send to each other. Sound waves travel underwater and are received by receptors in an  orca's head, in a center called the melon.  Orcas can locate landmarks and send and receive signals through series of clicks and whistles.  Just as a conversation between humans can be interrupted or even drowned out by external noise such as roar of traffic, construction noise, or even other loud human sounds, orcas can't receive each others' signals when they are drowned out by engine noise from boats and ships.  When signals are continually interrupted, the pod can't notify each other of food found by one orca who wants to share it with the rest.  They can't coordinate their movements and hunting activities. 

  • Sophia Keller's avatar
    Sophia Keller 11/01/2020 11:47 AM
    My "created action" for the Nature topic will actually take place next Spring.  My neighborhood has several green spaces that I'll seed with native wildflowers that attract pollinators.  Like everywhere, our community has suffered from the decrease of bee activity this year... but we also don't provide much to attract them.  In planting an abundance of plants for them to enjoy, I hope to support bee survival and also fulfill our need for their action.  I'll also cultivate pollinator-friendly growth in my garden and encourage neighbors to do the same. 

  • Sophia Keller's avatar
    Sophia Keller 11/01/2020 11:44 AM
    My "created action" for the Nature topic will actually take place next Spring.  My neighborhood has several green spaces that I'll seed with native wildflowers that attract pollinators.  Like everywhere, our community has suffered from the decrease of bee activity this year... but we also don't provide much to attract them.  In planting an abundance of plants for them to enjoy, I hope to support bee survival and also fulfill our need for their action.  I'll also cultivate pooliator-friendly growth in my garden and encourage neighbors to do the same. 

  • Sophia Keller's avatar
    Sophia Keller 11/01/2020 11:12 AM
    Planning to research the tribal lands my home is located on, during today.  We can identify the tribes whose land we use by entering our addresses at native-land.ca.  We can then learn about the tribes, their current status and issues, and how we can promote their health and sovereignty.  One action can be to pay rent to the tribes for the use of their land.  Many people are starting to do this. 

  • Sophia Keller's avatar
    Sophia Keller 11/01/2020 11:07 AM
    Just contacted 5 legislators to respectfully urge them to continue prioritizing orca recovery and Chinook salmon habitat reclamation.  

  • Sophia Keller's avatar
    Sophia Keller 11/01/2020 10:27 AM
    Made two small donations to wildlife protection initiatives.  Revised my gardening plans yesterday to include more bee-friendly plants.  Some volunteer is sprouting that looks like bee balm: will research it and promote its proliferation.  Also promoting Native Hope's initiative against child trafficking.  

  • Sophia Keller's avatar
    Sophia Keller 10/29/2020 7:45 PM
    When I studied community sustainability and social justice a few years ago I learned a great deal about the inequities of our society. But layered above the fundamental injustice is a constantly changing community.  During this challenge I've been shown many new developments  relevant to our nation's minorities.  
  • Reflection Question
    Community Support Environmental Initiatives lead by People of Color
    How does existing pollution, handling of pollution, urban planning, environmental health responses, and opportunities for equitable leadership exacerbate the inequities and disparities in our communities? How can we help alleviate that to promote a healthy community for all?

    Sophia Keller's avatar
    Sophia Keller 10/29/2020 7:36 PM
    Wherever there is industrial activity which contaminates air or water supply, land values decrease  This means that housing in those areas is affordable to lower income people.  The result is that poor populations are exposed to greater pollution and have a greater percentage of disabilities and illnesses associated with toxins in the air and water.  Because these people have a low income they may postpone or avoid the cost of healthcare, thus raising the mortality rate.  Poor populations have a high percentage of people of color, whose health and survival are threatened by the toxins they are forced to live with. 

  • Sophia Keller's avatar
    Sophia Keller 10/27/2020 7:54 PM
    I had never heard the term "food desert" before taking this Ecochallenge.   I had noticed the general decrease of fresh food markets during my lifetime, and the proliferation of fast food outlets, often all lined up in a shopping area, rather like a food court design.  The other phenomenon I've noticed is that people seem to be consuming more fast food and less nutritious options, even when the nourishing choices are available.  So desertification is not only an economic and geographic issue, it's also a response to demand.  More people are choosing fast food routinely even when they can find better options.   This produces a different form of malnutrition, as empty calories produce an epidemic of obesity, diabetes and heart disease.  Those of us who choose such an eating pattern really are "starving in the midst of plenty", as we substitute empty calories for actual nourishment.